Tag Archives: rule of law

Analysis of recent events

PPT has refrained from mentioning much of what passes for analysis of the events of the past week. One reason for this is that most of it has been highly speculative and bound in rumor. Some self-styled analysts and quite a few academics have produced speculative accounts. Several managed to come up with different interpretations […]

Academics, posterior polishing and freedom

Readers might recall a brief flurry of posts about the lackadaisical discussion of academic freedom in Thailand from an Australian-based historian. We complained that the events that saw several people associated with a conference in Chiang Mai being tried (since dropped) and with the situation of academics in Thailand could not be viewed as just […]

Abuse of power over many decades

A couple of days ago, The Nation reported that the  National Human Rights Commission Chair What Tingsamitr, recalling that Thailand had been one of the first nations to ratify the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, continues to have a serious human rights  problem. While What mentioned several groups “responsible” for for human rights abuses, this […]

Thaksin talks elections

Thaksin Shinawatra haunts the military junta. In several ways, he is there reason for being and for much of what they have done since seizing political power. It is Thaksin who they view as the enemy. It is Thaksin they seek to defeat in their “election.” So when he speaks, despite their hatred and fears, […]

Law and junta “law”

The issue of junta law versus rule of law has been discussed by academics.Discussing this aspect of “rule of law,” where the junta uses law for propaganda and for political repression, is of critical importance. An academic forum at Thammasat University “heard doubts about the legitimacy and lasting effects of laws enacted by the NCPO and […]

The lawless regime

PPT has long pointed to the lawlessness of the military dictatorship. It was an illegal and subversive act – a military coup – that brought it to power. The junta then enacted its own decrees and made itself and its illegal actions “legal.” Since then, the junta has regularly ruled by decree and martial law, […]

Updated: Digging in or grave-digging? III

Yesterday, students claimed that “political mockery involving luxury watches and military figures” was a no-go area during the 72nd Chulalongkorn-Thammasat football match scheduled for today: Latthaphol Yimlamai, a Thammasat University (TU) student who is president of the university’s political mockery group, said a high-ranking military officer had prohibited them from using Deputy Prime Minister Prawit […]