Tag Archives: military dictatorship

Coup learning

PPT wishes to draw attention to two retrospective articles published by Prachatai. Both can be considered the 2014 military coup and the period of military dictatorship in a context of the “failures” of the 2006 coup to demolish the “Thaksin regime.” The first, by Kornkritch Somjittranukit, claims that “[f]orming political alliances, securing military influence, creating […]

Justice system no longer makes sense

Double standards rule in the justice system. Sure, some yellow shirts get to courts for their actions, but their cases are slowed to a crawl, subject to seemingly endless appeals and so on. But when it comes to those who are accused of lese majeste or actions the military dictatorship considers threatening or unsettling, the […]

When the military is on top XI

It’s a while since we had a “When the military is on top” post. This post is prompted by a couple of recent stories reveal more about the military dictatorship and its aims. First, as we have noted previously, the dictatorship’s core task is uprooting the “Thaksin regime.” That task is deepening and widening. Following […]

Updated: Military propagandists to the world

The Thailand National News Bureau has reported that Deputy Dictator General Prawit Wongsuwan has held a ceremony to send off – the report uses the military term, “deploy” – a batch of 27 “military diplomats” to the rest of the world. These propagandists for the military dictatorship seem to be an additional “diplomatic” resource, supplementing […]

Updated: How’s that Potemkin election coming along?

Regular readers will know that PPT has not been skeptical about the military dictatorship’s “plans” for an “election.” For one thing, we think the military dictatorship has fixed any upcoming election to ensure that only its approved “politicians” can gain seats in government. It might be considered a Potemkin election. Then we have seen plenty […]

It is still a military dictatorship

Whatever happens today in the Yingluck Shinawatra verdict, Thailand will still be a military dictatorship tomorrow. Strangely, The Dictator and his underlings express a warped – mad is a better term – view that Thailand is a “democracy” despite a military regime that came to power overthrowing an elected government and throwing out constitutional law […]

The Economist on the military dictatorship

Bits from The Economist’s latest edition: Having been one of South-East Asia’s freest countries two decades ago, Thailand is now among the region’s most repressive…. Since its introduction, Section 44 has been invoked more than 150 times. A constitution adopted a little over a year ago allows the junta to keep using the legislation until […]