Tag Archives: iLaw

Not criticizing The Dictator

The puppet National Legislative Assembly has worked hard for the military junta. Passing laws, delaying laws, speaking the junta’s language and being loyally anti-democratic. So deeply committed to their junta employers is this hotch-potch of lazy generals, rewarded anti-democrats and automatons that, as Khaosod reports, “[m]ore than three quarters of [all] the bills made into […]

Lese majeste repression

The Bangkok Post has an editorial on lese majeste, calling for the “misuse and abuse” of the law be ended. Essentially, the editorial calls for the law to be rewritten, citing both Sulak Sivaraksa (one of the few to get off) and Nitirat. That’s about as brave as it gets in Thailand these days. Calling […]

Extreme lese majeste secrecy?

PPT had an email alert today about a lese majeste case. As it turned out, this was a link to an old Reuters story at the Jakarta Globe, from late May. That story referred to the arrest of “five people for allegedly setting fire to portraits of late King Bhumibol…”. The report set us thinking. […]

The dictatorship’s history

A reader drew our attention to an iLaw post that sets out the history of three years of military dictatorship in Thailand. It deserves to be read in full, even if it could be further extended. We quote a couple of bits: During the three years under the iron-fisted rule of the NCPO military regime, […]

Contemptible justice system

Readers will know that we have posted more than a few items that have shown and declared Thailand’s justice system an injustice system. The police have long been corrupt thugs. But they are now worse than ever thanks to the fact that a military dictatorship condones impunity. They have to repay the military junta with […]

On the junta’s use of lese majeste

Reproduced in full from the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), Union for Civil Liberty (UCL) and Internet Law Reform Dialogue (iLaw): (Bangkok, Paris) The number of individuals arrested on lèse-majesté charges since the May 2014 military coup has passed the 100 mark, FIDH and its member organizations Union for Civil Liberty (UCL) and Internet […]

Money for nothing

Many readers will have already seen Prachatai’s report on the iLaw study of the apparently unconstitutionality of some members of the military junta’s puppet National Legislative Assembly. We say “apparently” because the details of “leaves” taken are considered “secret.” The point made by iLaw – Prachatai’s report doesn’t seem to get it quite right – […]